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After releasing the Adidas F50 training kit a few weeks ago, Adidas now released the Adidas Predator Training Kit which includes a shirt, shorts, shinguards, gloves, a ball, and the Adidas predator swerve football boots.

Adidas Predator swerve climacool jersey

When your play is high power, high energy, and high-octane, you need a jersey that keeps it cool even when the game heats up. The Predator swerve jersey, with climacool technology, regulates your temperature so that you can keep up the pressure, longer.

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The Adidas F50.9 Training kit, including a shirt, shorts, shinguards, gloves, a ball, and the F50.9 Tunit football boots, with a sleek, new adiGrip upper for superior touch in all weather conditions.

Engineered lightweight microfiber synthetic for a soft and glove-like fit. Innovative seamless lace cover for optimal fit and a clean kicking surface.

Synthetic lining, adiDot improves ball touch, and comes with an exchangeable premolded TUNiT Standard insole for and exchangeable TUNiT Standard Chassis support and cushioning. For the outsole, Traxion for grip and comfort on firm, natural surfaces. Also comes with soft and hard ground stud sets.

Available for pre-order at the FSC shop

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One of the very few manufacturers that still produce their goods in Europe is Erreà. A number of clubs including Premiership side Middlesbrough have donned Erreà kits for a number of years. 

The two key areas Erreà are currently boasting are the introduction of Nanotechnology & Oeko-Tex systems to their teamwear.

But what are these two alien sounding technologies? And how can they actually help your club to succeed? 

Nanotechnology refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular level – easy!

Nanotechnologies may have a great impact on the whole textile/clothing industry.

 

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Running a team is hard work. You've got countless players and a season of fixtures to manage.

There are players who can't find the pitch (let alone their touch), players you've never seen before, latecomers, last-minute no-shows, holidays. And a world of pain.

Take the hassle out of organising football by managing your fixtures and teams online with Nike Playmaker.

Start by creating a fixture, finding a pitch with Google Maps and inviting the team. Playmaker automatically invites your players by text or email. No more endless email chains or unreturned calls.

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This is the FC St. Pauli training suit made by Do You Football for the 2008/09 season. The training suit is available Here.

 

FC St. Pauli enjoy certain fame for the left leaning character of its supporters: most of the team's fans regard themselves as anti-racist, anti-fascist and anti-sexist, and this has on occasion brought them into conflict with neo-Nazis and hooligans at away games.

 

The organization has taken up an outspoken stance against racism, fascism, sexism, and homophobia and has embodied this position in its constitution.

Nike Town’s Boot Room is due to launch in London soon. Want to give your whole team the edge? Drop by for a session on the Digital Team Builder and design anything from a 3-a-side kit to full squad apparel, right down to the cut of the cloth, your club crest and sponsor.

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A trio of football-freak scientists has come up with football shirts and football boots that change their colours as soon as a player commits a foul or strays offside. Austrians Christoph Doettelmayer and Joachim Kornauth, and German Svenja Schulz say that their "digital football pitch" technology can also provide goalposts and balls that change colour whenever the ball passes into the net.

The “Digital Football Pitch” will help to avoid crucial problems of the referees’ decision-making in professional football played by FIFA rules. Published in time for the UEFA Euro 2008 in Austria and Switzerland, it quickly gained international media attention, which was additionally raised by very controversial calls by some referees during the championship tournament. The “Digital Football Pitch” applies and uses advanced yet available technology to assess breach of the “FIFA Laws of the Game” by especially taking care of some key issues such as offside, ball over the goal line and out-of-bounds, as well as foul play by pulling opponent’s jerseys.

This is the new Nike PreCool Vest; not your average sports equipment, but it's very cool..

This is the new Nike PreCool Vest; not your average sports equipment, but it's very cool..A 1960s mini dress and medical packaging were the inspiration when it came to redesigning Nike's original PreCool Vest. First introduced at the Olympics in Athens, Nike wanted to make it lighter, more flexible, better fitting and refillable a tall order for a piece of equipment athletes have been praising since Athens.

The vest is designed to cool the body’s core temperature. Since 25% of our body’s total energy goes into moving muscle and 75% into regulating heat, reducing an athlete’s core temperature before the marathon or a field hockey match means more energy for the competition itself. Indeed, with core cooling, athletes can often last 21% longer. Given Beijing’s hot and humid conditions, the PreCool Vest is a key piece of equipment that can help provide the advantage an athlete needs.

Nike Virtual Park - glow in the dark spray paint

Unless you have easy access to stadium lighting, playing a quick game after dark can be nearly impossible. Designer Pierre Haulot has created the Virtual Park concep, a student project. Glow in the dark spray paint used to create goals, boundaries, a glowing ball and whatever else you need to keep the games going at night.

The idea is to consider this parameter not as a handicap but as a way to value the other senses, the imaginary and the imagination. The paint even disappears after two hours, and there will be no trace. The game is over. Have no limit, play anywhere!

Goal-line technology put on ice

At its Annual General Meeting today in Gleneagles, Scotland, the International Football Association Board (IFAB) has decided to put on ice goal-line technology and to stop tests in this area until further notice. Amongst others, the questions of the human aspect of the game, the universality of the Laws of the Game, as well as the simplicity and efficiency of the technology were taken into consideration.

However, the IFAB has approved a proposal from FIFA to conduct an experiment involving two additional assistant referees who will mainly focus on fouls and misconduct in the penalty area. The competition in which this test will be conducted will be decided at a later stage.