Geniune Alan Ball match worn England home shirt from the successful 1966 World cup campaign. It is a white round collared Umbro no 7 number shirt.Geniune Alan Ball match worn England home shirt from the successful 1966 World cup campaign. It is a white round collared Umbro no 7 number shirt.

It was worn against either Uruguay in the Opening game of the Finals, the controversial & heated Argentina quarter final or the semi final against Portugal (which was widely acclaimed as the best game of the tournament).

I have included a piece taken from the original Sothebys brochure back in 1998 to act as an indication of its authenticity - the shirt was originally given by Ball to his sister.

Any questions please contact myself directly. I am private collector not a dealer.

The shirt is supplied with full provenance from both Christies & Sothebys.

 

price: £4,995.00

Buy it now price (not sold)

It was worn against either Uruguay in the Opening game of the Finals, the controversial & heated Argentina quarter final or the semi final against Portugal (which was widely acclaimed as the best game of the tournament).

It is a white round collared Umbro no 7 number shirt.

I have included a piece taken from the original Sothebys brochure back in 1998 to act as an indication of its authenticity - the shirt was originally given by Ball to his sister.

Alan Ball's 1966 World Cup

Despite being in a struggling Blackpool team, Ball's industry, stamina and distribution were noticed by England manager Alf Ramsey, who gave him his international debut on May 9, 1965 in a 1-1 draw with Yugoslavia in Belgrade, three days before his twentieth birthday. Ramsey was preparing for the World Cup a year later, which England was to host, and was developing a system whereby England could deploy midfielders with a defensive and industrious bent, something which was not wholly guaranteed from conventional wide men. As a result, Ball became a useful tool for Ramsey to use - able to play conventionally wide or in the centre but still in possession of the energy to help out his defence when required.

Ball was the youngest member of the squad of 22 selected by Ramsey for the tournament, aged only 21. Though England as a team emerged collectively heroic from the tournament, Ball was one of many players regarded as an individual success, especially as he was one of the more inexperienced charges with no proven record at the very highest level.

Ball was the youngest member of the squad of 22 selected by Ramsey for the tournament, aged only 21. Though England as a team emerged collectively heroic from the tournament, Ball was one of many players regarded as an individual success, especially as he was one of the more inexperienced charges with no proven record at the very highest level. Indeed, he, Geoff Hurst and Martin Peters emerged with enormous credit and eternal acclaim from the competition - and all of them were still only in single figures for caps won by the time they were named in the team for the final against West Germany.

The 100,000 crowd at Wembley witnessed a magnificent personal performance from Ball. Full of running, he continued to work and sprint and track back while team-mates and opponents alike were out on their feet. With fewer than 15 minutes to go, he won a corner on the right which he promptly took. Hurst hit a shot from the edge of the area which deflected into the air and down on to the instep of Peters, who rifled England 2-1 ahead. The Germans equalised with seconds to go, meaning that the game went into extra time. Somehow, this instilled extra bounce into Ball's play and the image of his continuous running round the Wembley pitch, socks round his ankles, is one of the most enduring of the occasion. It was his chase and low cross which set up Hurst's massively controversial second goal, and England's third; he was also sprinting upfield, unmarked and screaming for a pass, as Hurst took the ball forward to smash his historic hat-trick goal with the last kick of the game.

 His funeral was held in Winchester Cathedral on Thursday, 3 May 2007. Ball is the second of the 1966 World Cup winning team to die, the first being captain Bobby Moore in 1993

Alan Ball was pronounced dead in the early hours of April 25, 2007 at his home in Warsash, Hampshire, following a heart attack. He was 61. He suffered the fatal heart attack while attempting to put out a blaze in his garden that had started when a bonfire - on which he had earlier been burning garden waste - became rekindled and spread to a nearby fence. His funeral was held in Winchester Cathedral on Thursday, 3 May 2007. Ball is the second of the 1966 World Cup winning team to die, the first being captain Bobby Moore in 1993.


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